[shineboys]
[s h i n e b o y s]
[shineboys]
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Two very important things to take away from this passage. 
1. This was never meant to be comfortable, convenient or easy.
When you think of social injustice, homelessness usually comes to mind. Those who are without permanent shelter… those who brave the elements and face everyday with questions of how their basic human needs will be met. When we think of Christ and His disciples, one thing we often forget is that they were nomads. They spent three years together traveling on foot through places with either extreme heat or cold. They were not working men so food and clothing and shelter and clean water to drink were things that were not always readily available to them. As the scribe approaches Christ, seemingly ready and zealous about following the savior, Jesus gives him a brisk reality check. In a nutshell, the animals of the land and sea have better living conditions than HIm and his followers. When we translate this into our own lives it brings us to face that divine mirror that scripture constantly holds in front of us. Are we consumed with materialism, “making it”, “getting on”, and living a “better life” than where we currently are more than we are consumed with carrying out the will of the Father?? After all, Christ is our ultimate example.
2. Even the good must go.
First off, let’s examine what the scribe was really asking Christ concerning his father. Despite the shallow studies that suggest that Christ denied the scribe the decency of attending his own father’s burial, a deeper examination of scripture shows us that the scribe is actually asking something more along the lines of “may I go and be with my father during his last years, bury him, get my family in order and THEN follow You?” Now even with this new revelation, some still consider it to be fairly rude for Christ to respond the way that He did, especially seeing that the man was not asking to go and do anything “bad”. He just wanted to secure his family life… or start his career… or get his degree… or get married first… or have his youthful, fun years to himself… or…. well, are you catching my drift?? None of the aforementioned things are bad things, however, for the sake of the gospel, sometimes even what seems to be good must be abandoned for the great. When Christ called his disciples, he didn’t say put down the crack pipe and follow me, or hey turn away from your molestation and follow me… the men he chose were doing honorable things.. doctors with a home practice… fishermen in the family business. Everyday people with regular jobs, just unassumingly living life were asked to abandon monotony and comfort to follow a man on a journey that would change the face of society forever. 
Be inspired.
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Q: spoiler alert: they all die in the end
Asked by Anonymous
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drankinwatahmelin:

swerve 
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gwayordafreeway:

prauprganda:

I shouldn’t have laughed


Dawg
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"In order to move on, you must understand why you felt what you did and why you no longer need to feel it."
Mitch Albom, Five People You Meet In Heaven  (via davidlynchshair)